World’s widest immersed channel takes shape

The first tube of the world’s widest immersed channel is expected to be put in position of a mega bridge across the Lin

gding Bay at the mouth of the Pearl River in South China soon, according to an assistant chief engineer of the project.

Yang Runlai from CCCC First Harbor Engineering Co Ltd said Thursday that workers are preparing

for the connection of a tunnel end on an island with the first immersed tube, the Science and Technology Daily reported.

Yang’s company took charge of constructing an island and major part of the tunnel of the Shenzhen-Zhongshan Bri

dge, another mega project of bridge, island and tunnel after the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge (HZMB).

The new project, 38 kilometers from the HZMB, is 24 kilometers long. It has the immer

sed tunnel in the east and the bridge section in the west to ensure the sea routes there.

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With a length of 6.8 kilometers and a width of 46 meters

the two-way eight-lane tunnel will be the largest and widest in the worl

d upon completion. Its tunnel will be 1.2 meters longer and two lanes wider than the HZMB.

Yang said the immersed tunnel used the steel shell tube, the first of its kind in China, and there were many other new struct

ures and technologies, which brought lots of challenges, such as lack of technical standards in the country.

He said the tunnel will have 32 tubes and each tube will have about 10,000 tons of steel, 165 met

ers long and with a displacement of about 80,000 tons. Each tube has more than 2,500 separate chambers.

After tubes are built in factory, they are floated to th

e construction site, and the most difficult process is to sink and connect, Yan

g said. His company has invited experts to deliberate in rounds on the cement pouring, sealing and connection.

The Shenzhen-Zhongshan Bridge is another important infrastructure project of the country’s 13th Five-Year Plan (2016-2020).

The construction started on Dec 29, 2016. It is expected to put into operation in 2024.

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hina aims to reduce cost of logisticsna aims to reduce

 logistics costs by nearly 121 billion yuan ($17.8 billion) this year, the Ministry of Transport an

nounced on Thursday at a news conference of the State Council Information Office.

Spokesman Wu Chungeng said the ministry will unveil a st

ring of measures not only to cut costs but to promote innovative development of the industry.

China will continue to increase railway freight volume, upgrade its

water transportation system, regulate highway freight transport and speed up mul

timodal transport in a bid to improve its logistics network and optimize its structure, Wu said.

It will also further integrate important ports and harbors into the inland multimodal transport and logistics netw

ork, which will connect them with more railways and highways and enable improved cargo interoperability, he said.

The country will also expand the use of pilot programs to deepe

n reform of the administrative law enforcement system in the logistics industry to improve i

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More appetite among Chinese, Asian collectors for Western art

hinese and Asian art collectors have become more knowledgeable, sophisticated and are branching out for m

ore Western works, said Francis Belin, president of Christie’s Asia, who is excited about the trend.

“Chinese clients have evolved from being very dedicated to Chinese arts to gaining increasing interest

in other categories and expanding the spectrum of the type of objects that they wish to collect,” Belin told

Xinhua in an interview in New York City during Christie’s Asian Art Week held on March 19-26.

Diversity of collecting is one of three “fundamental trends” the auction house has obse

rved among the Chinese and Asian buyers, Belin said, noting the increased appetite to collect across categories.

About 10 or 20 years ago, Asian collectors focused primarily on the art that relates to their own c

ulture, he said, “we’ve seen this evolved in the past years to be much more holistic in the collecting of our Asian buyers.”

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Cities emerging into new post-Brexit financial centers

The United Kingdom’s decision to leave the European Union has led major

financial companies in London to move assets and staff to continental Europe, mea

ning the post-Brexit landscape is likely to be far more “polycentric” than it is today

and far less centered on one location.

According to a recent report by think tank The New Financial, more than 40 companies have shifted staff or oper

ations to more than one financial center within the EU, with 100 choosing the

Irish capital as a post-Brexit location, whi

ch was the most popular choice ahead of Luxembourg, with 60, Paris with 41, Frankfurt with 40, and Amsterdam with 32.

William Wright, principal author of the

New Financial Brexitometer report, said: “One of the most strikin

g findings of our analysis is the extent to which Europe will become a much more

‘multipolar’ world as a result of Brexit.”

Companies are migrating to, or expanding in, multiple financial centers, with man

y either establishing a dedicated division for EU business or spreading their staff

more evenly throughout the EU.

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Former vice-minister of public security expelled from Party

Taking a step requires just one second for a typical person. But not for Gao Ziren, whose paral

yzed left leg requires him to first move a crutch forward before his leg, and then balance himself.

For 42 years, Gao, a teacher at Lixin village primary school in a mountainous area of East China’s Jiangxi province, has walked th

is way between his home, the school and his students’ homes. Over the course of his career, he has worn out more than 60 crutches.

Gao, 60, was born in a mountainous area of Meiling township, Wanli district of Nancha

ng. After coming down with polio at the age of 1, his left leg suffered muscular atrophy, which left him unable to walk normally.

He did not give up, relying instead on his mental strength to finish his studies from primary school through high school.

He started his career in 1977 when a village official visited him about being a teacher in the village, as one of the two teachers the

re had left. Gao agreed to take the position, as he knew the importance of a teacher to students, especially those like him.

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The roads were sandy and muddy in the past, causing him t

m to stumble on the roads. “One year, it was snowing, and I walked more than one hour to the s

chool. My colleague helped me half of the way — otherwise, I might have fallen into the gully,” he said.

Gao Yangyao, who worked with Gao Ziren for many years, said that “he has difficulty walking, but he is usually the first to come to school.”

Gao Ziren’s Mandarin Chinese was not so good in the beginning, and he continued listening to radio broadcasts to improve his pro

nunciation. When students had the wrong pronunciation, he would correct them, even when it cost the whole class time.

In 1980s, the mountainous area had poor teaching conditions, with a lack of desks and benches, so Gao br

ought some desks and benches from home. When some impoverished students had no stationery, he would buy it for them.

Gao Xiaomei, one of the first students Gao Ziren taught and now a school principal in Meiling, said that he taught child

ren carefully and usually walked close to students to help them solve problems. His carefulness led her to be a teacher.

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Zhang Zuhao, a sixth grade student, used to misbehave and h

ve and have little interest in his studies, not even finishing homework. In order to change his

attitude, Gao Ziren visited his home every weekend, talking with his parents about the importance of studying.

Zhang Guangxing, Zhang Zuhao’s father, still remembered when Gao Ziren first visited

his home. Because of Gao’s insistence, the parents paid more attention to the child’s studies.

Gao Ziren said that because he walked slowly, it was too late for him to visit stud

ents’ homes after school, and therefore, he visited them on the weekends.

Now, many children follow their parents to live and study in cities, while som

e become left-behind children who live in rural areas and lack family care. Gao said it w

as important to be patient with left-behind children and pay more attention to their mental health.

Gao Xinyue, a second grade student who lives with her grandparents because her paren

ts work outside the rural area, was reticent and very timid when she first came to the school, performing poorly in her studies.

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They’re the tiepishihu (dendrobium officinale), a valuable C

hinese herbal medicine,” said Ruan Jian, deputy manager of Anlong Xic

heng Xiushu Agriculture and Forestry. “Zhegui village has sufficient forest coverage, with p

roper altitude and climatic conditions, which is very suitable for growing imitation wild dendrobium.”

The plant, a member of the orchid family, is known as an important traditional medi

cine in China since many of its biomedical benefits have been scientifically examined.

Wild dendrobium officinale became an endangered species in the 1980s. However, with

the breakthrough of tissue culture technology in the early 2000s, artificially cultivated plants entered the market.

With the expansion in scale, dendrobium planted in some region

s suffered from problems such as pesticide residue, elevated levels of heavy metals and poor quality.

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We grow high-quality dendrobium without samake a livi

logical environment, allowing the villagers to make a living from the mount

ains,” said Ruan, who introduced the medicinal herb to the forest after a thorough investigation.

Oaks in the village have rough, thick barks, rich in water

and nutrients, making it easier for the dendrobium to attach to the trees and absorb more nutrients.

Since 2013, the company has planted dendrobium on the tree trunks of more than 267 hectares of oak forest.

For a long time, however, transportation difficulties meant the landloc

ked village could not capitalize on its unique ecological advantage. Growing dend

robium officinale was something villagers, including 44-year-old Chen Jian, had never thought of.

“All the oaks are ‘cash cows’ now,” Chen said. “Natural forests cannot be cut, so we did nothing but protect them in the past. Eve

since the dendrobium were ‘planted’ on the tree trunks, the green hills that we have kept for decades have turned into gold.”

Located in Anlong county, in Guizhou’s Qiannan Buyei and Miao autonomous prefect

ure, Zhegui is rich in forestry resources and has a climate that is neither too hot in summer nor too cold in winter.

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